Corporate Fraud and Criminal Law

We are Stibbe Corporate Fraud and Criminal Law specialists

The breadth of our expertise ensures clients are supported in any issue they face in fraud or white-collar crime matters.

Corporate Fraud and Criminal Law

From the start of any domestic or international investigation or prosecution, we provide immediate assistance and guidance to our corporate clients.

Dedicated to handling fraud and white-collar crime matters, our expert team provides assistance in matters relating to money-laundering, corruption and public procurement fraud, tax fraud, environmental criminal law and many other economic and criminal offences. Our team also offers practical advice on how to comply with regulations in order to prevent such violations.

We provide assistance right from the start of any investigation. For example, we are present during raids and interrogations by investigative authorities. We also have extensive experience in conducting negotiations with criminal authorities. 

When a case is brought before the criminal court against our client’s company or employees, we assist them during the entire procedure. We act in cases before the District Courts, Courts Of Appeal, Supreme Court, the European Court of Human Rights and Belgium’s Supreme Court (Hof van Cassatie/Cour de cassation) and the Netherlands Supreme Court (Hoge Raad). 

Working in close partnership with other departments of our firm – such as the tax law and public procurement law departments – we ensure that our clients enjoy all the benefits that our full service firm can offer.


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