Corporate Fraud and Criminal Law

We are Stibbe Corporate Fraud and Criminal Law specialists

The breadth of our expertise ensures clients are supported in any issue they face in fraud or white-collar crime matters.

Corporate Fraud and Criminal Law

From the start of any domestic or international investigation or prosecution, we provide immediate assistance and guidance to our corporate clients.

Dedicated to handling fraud and white-collar crime matters, our expert team provides assistance in matters relating to money-laundering, corruption and public procurement fraud, tax fraud, environmental criminal law and many other economic and criminal offences. Our team also offers practical advice on how to comply with regulations in order to prevent such violations.

We provide assistance right from the start of any investigation. For example, we are present during raids and interrogations by investigative authorities. We also have extensive experience in conducting negotiations with criminal authorities. 

When a case is brought before the criminal court against our client’s company or employees, we assist them during the entire procedure. We act in cases before the District Courts, Courts Of Appeal, Supreme Court, the European Court of Human Rights and Belgium’s Supreme Court (Hof van Cassatie/Cour de cassation) and the Netherlands Supreme Court (Hoge Raad). 

Working in close partnership with other departments of our firm – such as the tax law and public procurement law departments – we ensure that our clients enjoy all the benefits that our full service firm can offer.


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21.02.2018 NL law
Termination clauses in agreements and Dutch standards of reasonableness and fairness

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08.03.2018 NL law
Dutch courts can reduce contractually agreed penalties to an amount that is not unacceptable

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11.01.2018 NL law
Witness examination and the withdrawal of a judge

Short Reads - In its decision of 24 November 2017 (ECLI:NL:HR:2017:3016), the Dutch Supreme Court confirmed that a judge is allowed to critically interrogate a witness and remind a witness of his oath. Such action is not an indication that a judge is not impartial or independent.

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23.02.2018 NL law
Can acts and statements from an unauthorised representative qualify as acknowledgment of liability and interrupt a limitation period?

Short Reads - On 26 January 2018, the Supreme Court delivered a judgment (ECLI:NL:HR:2018:108) about the interruption of the limitation period for a claim for damages. The key element in this case was whether the acts and statements of an insurer and a loss adjuster qualified as an acknowledgement of liability and, if so, whether this acknowledgement could be attributed to the liable party

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10.01.2018 NL law
Fire, furniture and strict liability for buildings used for business

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