Seminar

15 June 2017: Seminar “What does your organization know?"

15 June 2017: Seminar “What does your organization know?"

15 June 2017: Seminar “What does your organization know?"

24.05.2017 NL law

The increased digitization of communication makes it more difficult to keep track of information that enters a company. Whether the incoming information reaches the right employees often depends on chance. But sharing or not sharing certain information can have far-reaching legal consequences.

Even if there is an understandable explanation why, for instance, important information about a customer doesn’t reach the right department, the organization as a whole may still be deemed to have the knowledge at hand – and may be expected to act on it. Not responding to an unsolicited email may constitute an infringement of the cartel prohibition, which may result in very large fines being imposed. An innocent slip of the tongue about developments at a listed company can expose organizations to penalties due to the use of inside information. To create awareness of these types of risks, Stibbe will host a seminar about dissemination and protection of information within organizations: "What does your organization know?"

Programme:

  • Opening by Lineke Sneller, Professor in IT Value at Nyenrode Business University and member of the supervisory board at Achmea, ProRail, CCV and other companies.
  • Which knowledge of employees is attributed to companies? – Branda Katan, Lawyer and specialist in Commercial Litigation at Stibbe. Branda recently finished a PhD on this topic.
  • How do companies prevent competition law fines as a result of receiving market information? - Floris ten Have, Lawyer and expert in Competition Law at Stibbe.
  • When does an organization have inside information? - Professor Daan Doorenbos, Lawyer and expert in Corporate Crime at Stibbe.
  • How can an (investigative) authority or other party specifically determine which documents and information are held by the company? - Kevin Strooy, Senior Forensic IT Expert at Fox-IT.
  • Close and drinks

This seminar is free. To attend or for more information, please send an email to: StibbeEvents@Stibbe.com.

When: 15 June 2017 from 14.30 -17.00.

Where: Stibbe office: Beethovenplein 10 – Amsterdam.

Kindly note the seminar will be held in Dutch.

Team

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