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Actions for Damages in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Germany 2015 (Oxford University Press)

Actions for Damages in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and German

Actions for Damages in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Germany 2015 (Oxford University Press)

25.01.2015 EU law

A survey that discusses the developments with regard to claims for damages resulting from competition law infringements in the three most prominent European jurisdictions in this area: the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Germany.

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