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Guidelines by the International Olympic Committee for transgender athletes

Guidelines by the International Olympic Committee for transgender athletes

05.02.2016 EU law

In November 2015, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) reached a consensus on “Sex Reassignment and Hyperandrogenism” for transgender athletes.

Since the 2003 Stockholm Consensus on Sex Reassignment in Sports, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of autonomy of gender identity in society, as reflected in the laws of many jurisdictions worldwide. However, there are also jurisdictions where autonomy of gender identity is not recognized in law at all.

To ensure insofar as possible that trans athletes are not excluded from the opportunity to participate in sporting competition, the IOC Consensus Meeting agreed guidelines to be taken in account by sports organizations when determining eligibility to compete in male and female competition.

Those who transit from female to male are eligible to compete in the male category without restriction but those who transit from male to female are eligible to compete in the female category under following conditions: the declaration in which the athlete declared that her gender identity is female, cannot be changed for at least 4 years; the athlete must demonstrate that her testosterone level in serum has been below 10 nmol/L for at least 12 months prior to her first competition and the total testosterone level in serum must remain below 10 nmol/L. When the athlete does not pass the compliance tests, a suspension will be inflected for a period of 12 months.

The IOC also made recommendations to put rules in place that protect women in sports and promote fair competition. Any discrimination of hyperandrogenism should be avoided by opening male competitions to female transgenders.

(IOC Consensus Meeting on Sex Reassignment and Hyperandrogenism, November 2015)

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