Articles

Flemish Region implements EU Directive on industrial emissions: new concepts and obligations

Flemish Region implements EU Directive on industrial emissions: new concepts and obligations

Flemish Region implements EU Directive on industrial emissions: new concepts and obligations

11.09.2013 BE law

The Flemish Region’s detailed, implementing legislation of Directive 2010/75/EU (the “Industrial Emissions Directive” or “IED”) was published in the Belgian State Gazette1 yesterday.
 

Also available in Dutch.

The Flemish Region is the second region to give force to the IED2. The Walloon Region implemented it in February 2013 after the Walloon Government’s adoption of four Orders3.  This implementation was further given form by the Walloon Government’s adoption of an Order of 4 July 20134. Brussels has not implemented it in its legislation. In the Netherlands, implementation is nearly finished. As to the Dutch implementation of the IED, see the newsletter of Stibbe Amsterdam. France also recently finished implementing the IED5.

The IED recasts several old EU Directives, but it also introduces several new concepts. This newsletter gives you a first look into the most radical changes that affect operators of industrial activities.

1. The IED, industrial emissions directive (2010/75/EU) 

The European Union’s adoption of the IED on 24 November 2010 is basically a recast of several existing European Directives:

-       the IPPC Directive (Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control Directive)6;
-       the Large Combustion Plants Directive7;
-       the Waste Incineration Directive8;
-       the VOC Solvents Emissions Directive9; and
-       three Directives on Titanium Dioxide10.

The IED serves as a general legal binding framework for Member States when determining national rules for the integrated prevention and elimination of pollution caused by certain industrial activities. In addition to the existing Directives and the obligations arising from them that are already in place in the legal framework, the IED introduces some new concepts and obligations. The approach taken by the IPPC Directive remains the core approach taken in the IED as well, i.e., the (integrated) protection of the environment as a whole instead of several individual initiatives for just one component of the environment. Compared to the IPPC Directive, the IED strengthens this integrated approach even more.

2. The Flemish region's implementation of the IED

The first step in the Flemish IED implementation process occurred on 25 May 2012 when the Flemish Parliament adopted modifications to the three existing Flemish Decrees relating to the environmental permit, general environmental policy, and soil11. However, these modifications only outline the general policy on industrial emissions and have no direct consequences for industrial operators.

The second step was the Flemish Government’s issue of an Order for the IED implementation (“Flemish IED Implementation Order”). On 7 June 2013 the Flemish Government adopted modifications to the following Orders:

-       the Order of the Flemish Government of 6 February 1991 on the adoption of the Flemish regulations on the environmental permit (“VLAREM I”);
-       the Order of the Flemish Government of 1 June 1995 on the general and sectorial provisions with regard to environmental protection (“VLAREM II”);
-       the Order of the Flemish Government of 14 December 2007 on the adoption of the Flemish regulation on soil remediation and soil protection (“VLAREBO”).

With today’s publication of the Flemish IED Implementation Order in the Belgian State Gazette, the IED is given force and is fully implemented in the Flemish Region. The general date of entry into force of most rules of the Flemish IED Implementation Order is 20 September 2013. There are also some exceptions and postponements of dates of entry into force for existing large combustion plants, among others.

3. Most important new concepts that apply to industrial operations

3.1          The scope of industrial activities has been broadened significantly

-       What does the IED stipulate?

The scope of the IED is broadened substantially because lower thresholds apply.

The IED covers all of the industrial activities mentioned in Annex 1. This Annex refers to energy industries, production and processing of metals, mineral industry, chemical industry, waste management, and other activities (e.g., the exploitation of slaughterhouses), and certain activities and installations using organic solvents.

According to the other Directives which had been replaced by the adoption of the IED (supra), the IED also covers installations that fell within the scope of these Directives. It mainly concerns large combustion plants, waste and co-incineration plants (any capacity), and titanium dioxide producing installations.

Compared to the old IPPC-Directive, the scope of the IPPC-activities was broadened in the sense that the IED also covers combustion plants with a power below 50 MW; disposal or recovery of waste in waste incineration plants or in waste co-incineration plants for hazardous waste with a capacity exceeding 10 tons per day; preservation of wood and wood products with chemicals with a production capacity exceeding 75 m3 per day other than exclusively treating against stain in lumber; etc.

-       New rules in VLAREM I

The broader scope of the IED was fully transposed into the Flemish IED implementation legislation. The Flemish IED Implementation Order equally transposes all categories of industrial activities, as mentioned in Annex 1 of the IED, in Annex 1 of VLAREM I.

3.2          The Best Available Techniques (BAT)

-       What does the IED stipulate?

As mentioned, an integrated approach towards all components of the environment is essential for the reduction of industrial emissions. The application of the Best Available Techniques (“BAT”) is the most important instrument for this approach. Hence, BAT is central to the IED thus also the Flemish IED implementation Order.

To make the application of BAT within the permitting procedure more strict, the notion of BAT had to be clarified. This resulted in the adoption of three new definitions for these notions: “Best Available Techniques12(BAT)” ; “BAT reference document13”, and “BAT conclusions14”.

According to the IED, BAT is the basis for determining not only emission limit values but also other permit conditions (Article 14.3 of the IED). However, the European Union wishes to go even further in pursuit of prevention and reduction of industrial emissions. Article 14 (4) of the IED allows Member States to set out rules for the competent authority to adopt stricter permit conditions than the ones achievable by using BAT.

Despite the general principle that Member States may not approve emission limit values that surpass the ones achievable by using BAT, Articles 15 (4) and (5) of the IED allow Member States’ competent authorities to grant derogations from this principle in specific cases (Article 15 (4) of the IED) or for the testing or use of emerging techniques (Article 15 (5) of the IED).

-       New rules in VLAREM I

The importance of BAT within the Flemish permitting procedure is reflected in several modifications to VLAREM I. For example, reference can be made to the new Article 30bis, § 6 of VLAREM I. This Article states that BAT is the reference that must be used by permitting authorities when the latter determine specific permit conditions. The criterion of BAT thus becomes a binding standard in the permitting procedure itself15.

The new Article 30bis, §7 of VLAREM I allows the Flemish permitting authorities to adopt specific  and stricter permit conditions than what is achievable by using BAT. These permit conditions must be based on a need to protect humans and the environment, but they can also be adopted out of necessity (e.g., when specific local circumstances demand a higher level of environmental protection).

 

Derogations are possible from the general principle that BAT is the ultimate reference when determining the permit conditions. For example, on the basis of new Article 30bis, §10 of VLAREM I, the permitting authorities may grant emission limit values that differ from the ones stated in the BAT conclusions in terms of level, periods, as well as reference situations. The permitting authorities may also grant a temporary exemption from the aforementioned principle for the testing or use of emerging techniques.

3.3          More stringent emission limit values

-       What does the IED stipulate?

The IED stipulates more stringent emission limit values for large combustion plants and installations that produce titanium dioxide.

These substances have emission limit values: CO, NOx, VOC, SO2, PM10, dioxins and furans, TOC, HCL, HF, NO, NO2, Cd, TI, Hg, Sb, As, Pb, Cr, CO, Cu, Mn, Ni, V,  and Zn.

Although the general obligation of Member States to transpose the IED into national laws, regulations, and administrative provisions is no later than 7 January 201316, Article 82 lays down different deadlines for the transitional implementation of the new emission limit values:

1° in relation to installations carrying out certain activities17 and which are in operation and hold a permit before 7 January 2013 or the operators of installations which have submitted a complete application for a permit before that date, provided that those installations are put into operation no later than 7 January 2014, Member States must apply the newly adopted laws, regulations and administrative provisions from 7 January 2014 (except Chapter III18  and Annex V19  of the IED);

2° with regard to installations that do not fall within the scope of said transitional arrangement20, Member States must only apply these newly adopted laws, regulations, and administrative provisions from 7 July 2015 (except Chapters III and IV21  and Annexes V and VI22  of the IED);

3° in relation to combustion plants23 referred to in Article 30 (2) of the IED, Member States must  apply the newly adopted laws, regulations, and administrative provisions starting 1 January 2016 to comply with Chapter III and Annex V of the IED.

-       New rules in VLAREM II

The emission limit values (the actual numbers) have been implemented without change.

The initial draft of the Flemish IED Implementation Order proposed a retroactive entry into force.

The Flemish government justified this retroactive application by referring to several other European Directives for which the period for implementation had long passed. However, the Department of Legislation within the Council of State ruled against the retroactive entry into force. After all, the Flemish IED Implementation Order provides several new (and stringent) obligations (e.g., emission limit values almost twice as stringent as those currently in place). Giving retroactive effect to the Order would conflict with the principle of legal certainty and the principle of foreseeability of the regulations. In its final version, the Flemish IED Implementation Order no longer stipulates that the legislation should come into effect retroactively. Subsequently, the provisions will, generally, enter into force only after it has been published officially.

However, the provisions on the Flemish IED Implementation Order’s entry into force allow, generally, for two types of derogations:

- a general derogation for operators that submitted a full application before the entry into force of the Flemish IED implementation Order and for installations (not being GHG-installations)24 that were in operation at the moment of entry into force of the same Order but fall under a new or a modified category of Annex 1 of VLAREM 1 as a result of this Order, and as long as they were already subject to a permitting duty under Annex 1 of VLAREM I at the moment of this Order’s entry into force.

- a specific derogation for the installations covered by Article 238 of the Flemish IED Implementation Order25 and for the IPPC-installations, other than the ones mentioned in Article 238, but in operation or granted an environmental permit before 7 January 2013 or for which a complete application for an environmental permit was introduced before 7 January 2013 and that was taken in operation no later than 7 January 2014.

3.4          Baseline report

-       What does the IED stipulate?

The IED considers that drawing up a baseline report is essential “to ensure that the operator of an installation does not deteriorate the quality of soil and groundwater” (Consideration 24 of the IED). This obligation is brand new and did not exist in the predecessors of the IED.

This baseline report, which represents the “zero-setting”, should be a practical tool that permits, as far as possible, a quantified comparison between the state of the site described in the baseline report and the state of the site upon definitive cessation of activities. The purpose of this is to ascertain whether a significant increase in pollution of soil or groundwater has taken place. Therefore, the baseline report should contain information that make use of existing data on soil and groundwater measurements and historical data related to past uses of the site.

According to Article 22 of the IED, this obligation is triggered before the start of operation or – if the installation is already in operation at the moment of entry into force of the IED implementation laws and regulations – before a permit of an existing installation is updated for the first time after 7 January 2013 (“preliminary duty”), and finally upon definitive cessation of activities.

The preliminary duty only applies to installations whose activities involve the use, production, or release of relevant hazardous substances. Understandably, such activities require a greater sense of awareness.

If the baseline report, drawn up upon definitive cessation of activities, shows that the installation has caused a significant pollution of soil or groundwater compared to the state established as a result of the preliminary duty, the operator is obliged to take the necessary measures in returning the soil and/or groundwater to its previous state (as established by the initial baseline report).

Moreover, the IED states that if the established contamination of soil and groundwater poses a significant threat to human health or the environment, the operator must take the necessary measures to remove, control, contain, or reduce relevant hazardous substances to neutralize this risk.

-       New rules in VLAREBO

                -              Recap of the existing soil and groundwater rules

Since 1995, the Flemish regulations on soil and groundwater already impose several soil and groundwater obligations on operators of risk installations, i.e., installations and activities operated on risk land26. The Flemish Soil Decree of 27 October 2006 lays down specific obligations that must be complied with for transfer of so-called “land at risk” or “risk land27”.

A transfer of risk land requires the drafting of a preliminary soil survey (the “PSS”) and, if necessary, a descriptive soil survey (the “DSS”), possibly followed by a soil remediation project.

Also, certain operators of risk facilities must conduct a PSS periodically. This periodic investigation obligation might also trigger soil remediation. The Soil Decree imposes, under specific conditions28, a soil remediation obligation on the operator of a facility (or the user or owner) on the land on which the pollution was generated unless it is eligible for exemption.

Operators of risk facilities must also notify the OVAM of the definitive cessation of their risk activities. This notification must be accompanied by a PSS. Depending on the results of the PSS, the OVAM may require the operator to conduct a DSS and possibly to draw up a soil remediation project.

                -              New rules on the baseline report

Implementing the IED’s obligation to draw up a baseline report led to the Flemish legislation’s imposing of an additional soil survey obligation (new Article 33bis of the Soil Decree). Only operators of a limited number of risk-installations are obligated to draw up the baseline report. The risk-installations requiring a baseline report are indicated by the letter S in column 8 of Annex 1 of VLAREM I. 

When a baseline report must be drawn up to assess the zero-setting of the soil, the derogations described in Articles 64–67 of VLAREBO29  do not apply.

It is impossible to determine the zero-setting when it comes to installations that are already in operation at the moment of the Flemish IED Implementation Order’s entry into force. However, this does not imply that these installations are exempt from this duty because Article 33bis§1 of the Soil Decree imposes in such scenarios to conduct a baseline report before 7 January 2014 (or, in some scenarios, before 7 July 2015). This approach differs from that of the IED because the latter stipulates that a baseline report must be drawn up before the permit for an installation is updated for the first time after 7 January 2013.

Until today, the Flemish environmental legislation does not stipulate such periodic reconsideration and update of the permit conditions that are to be made by the permitting authorities. However, this is about to change in view of the “single permit” that is coming soon. The idea of a periodic assessment of the permit conditions has been transformed into the project for a Decree on the single permit, currently in preparation. The baseline report needs to be seen as an accompanying measure of the implementation of the single permit procedure.

 

 

4. The implementation of the directive in the Netherlands: a different approach?

The IED including the crucial role of BAT in the permitting procedure has also been transposed into the legislation of the Netherlands. Unlike Flanders, the Dutch authorities use a system of a single permit. The single permit is permanent but must be updated from time to time. Some of the modifications to the Dutch Act on the general provisions on environmental law (known as the “Wabo”) include the following:

- the publishing of BAT conclusions should be considered “developments in the field of technical possibilities to protect the environment”. These BAT conclusions must be taken into account when updating the permit;

- when updating the permit, the permitting authorities can also adopt provisions on the application of other techniques that were not applied for. This allows the permitting authority to change the contents of the permit application.

Footnotes

 

 

  1. Belgian State Gazette, http://www.ejustice.just.fgov.be/cgi/welcome.pl
  2. In Belgium, matters relating to emissions and environmental protection are no longer governed by the federal government; they are governed by each of the three regional governments. Because of this, all EU directives on  environmental protection must be implemented in each of the three regions of Belgium: the Flemish, Walloon, and Brussels Capital Regions.
  3. The Order of the Walloon Government of 21 February 2013 on determining the sectorial conditions on the incineration plants and on the incineration of waste; The Order of the Walloon Government of 21 February 2013 modifying the Order of the Walloon Government of 18 July 2002 on the sectorial conditions for installations and/or activities that use solvents; The Order of the Walloon Government of 21 February 2013 determining the sectorial conditions for installations that produce titanium dioxide; The Order of the Walloon Government 21 February 2013 determining the sectorial conditions for combustion plants.
  4. The Order of the Walloon Government of 4 July 2013 amending the Order of the Walloon Government of 13 December 2007 implementing the obligation to periodically notify environmental data, the Order of the Walloon Government of 18 July 2002 on the sectorial conditions for installations and/or activities that use solvents and the Order of the Walloon Government of 4 July 2002 on the procedure and various measures to execute the Decree of 11 March 1999 on the environmental permit.
  5. The most recent implementation act of the IED is Order n° 2013-374 of 2 May 2013 on the transposition of chapter II of the directive 2010/75/EU of the European Parliament and the Council of 24 November 2010 on the industrial emissions. Many other Member States have implemented the IED with several legal acts. However, according to the information of the European Commission 7 Member States remain without any implementation measures (see http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:72010L0075:EN:NOT).
  6. Directive 2008/01/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 January 2008 concerning integrated pollution prevention and control.
  7. Directive 2001/80/EG of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2001 on the limitation of emissions of certain pollutants into the air from large combustion plants.
  8. Directive 2000/76/EG of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 December 2000 on the incineration of waste.
  9. Council Directive 1999/13/EG of 11 March 1999 on the limitation of emissions of volatile organic compounds due to the use of organic solvents in certain activities and installations.
  10. Council Directive 78/176/EEG of 20 February 1978 on waste from the titanium dioxide industry, Council Directive 82/883/EEG of 3 December 1982 on procedures for the surveillance and monitoring of environments concerned by waste from the titanium dioxide industry, Council Directive 92/112/EEG 15 December 1992 on procedures for harmonizing the programmes for the reduction and eventual elimination of pollution caused by waste from the titanium dioxide industry.
  11. The Decree of 28 June 1985 on the environmental permit; the Decree of 5 April 1995 on the general provisions with regard to the environmental policy; the Decree of 27 October 2006 on soil sanitation and soil protection.
  12. Best available techniques “means the most effective and advanced stage in the development of activities and their methods of operation which indicates the practical suitability of particular techniques for providing the basis for emission limit values and other permit conditions designed to prevent and, where that is not practicable, to reduce emissions and the impact on the environment as a whole (…)” (Article 3 (10) IED).
  13. BAT reference document “means a document, resulting from the exchange of information organised pursuant to Article 13, drawn up for defined activities and describing, in particular, applied techniques, present emissions and consumption levels, techniques considered for the determination of best available techniques as well as BAT conclusions and any emerging techniques, giving special consideration to the criteria listed in Annex III” (Article 3 (11) IED).
  14. BAT conclusions “means a document containing the parts of a BAT reference document laying down the conclusions on best available techniques, their description, information to assess their applicability, the emission levels associated with the best available techniques, associated monitoring, associated consumption levels and, where appropriate, relevant site remediation measures” (Article 3(12) IED).
  15. The Flemish Region is already working on yet another modification of the VLAREM-rules. The draft for a VLAREM-modification later in 2013 foresees, among others, the implementation of new BAT conclusions that translate the BAT for the production of iron and steel as well as the BAT for the glass producing industry. A first principal approval of these changes is scheduled for October 2013.
  16. See Article 80 of the IED.
  17. These activities concern the activities mentioned in Annex I, point 1.1 combustion of fuels in installations with a total rated thermal input exceeding 50 MW; point 1.2, point 1.3, point 1.4(a), points 2.1 to 2.6, points 3.1 to 3.5, points 4.1 to 4.6 for activities concerning production by chemical processing, points 5.1 and 5.2 for activities covered by Directive 2008/1/EC, point 5.3 (a)(i) and (ii),point 5.4, point 6.1(a) and (b), points 6.2 and 6.3, point 6.4(a),point 6.4(b) for activities covered by Directive 2008/1/EC, point 6.4(c) and points 6.5 to 6.9.
  18. Chapter III holds special provisions for combustion plants.
  19. Annex V holds the technical provisions relating to combustion plants which, amongst others, refer to the emission limit values for combustion plants.
  20. Thus, this provision applies to installations carrying out activities referred to in Annex I, point 1.1 for activities with a total rated thermal input of 50 MW, point 1.4(b), points 4.1 to 4.6 for activities concerning production by biological processing, points 5.1 and 5.2 for activities not covered by Directive 2008/1/EC, point 5.3(a)(iii) to (v), point 5.3(b), points 5.5 and 5.6, point 6.1(c), point 6.4(b) for activities not covered by Directive 2008/1/EC and points 6.10 and 6.11 which are in operation before 7 January 2013.
  21. Chapter IV holds special provisions for waste incineration plants and waste co-incineration plants.
  22. Annex VI holds technical provisions relating to waste incineration plants and waste co-incineration plants.
  23. The notion “combustion plants” aims at combustion plants with a total rated thermal input that is equal to or greater than 50 MW, irrespective of the fuel used.
  24. These installations do not refer to GHG-installations (greenhouse gas). The GHG-installations with an environmental permit on 1 January 2013 for activities and processes that result into GHG-emissions and falling within the scope of the modification in consequence of the Directive 2009/29/EG of the European Parliament and the Council of 23 April 2009 on the modification of the Directive 2003/87/EG in order to improve and expend the regulations for the trade in greenhouse gas emission rights, are considered to be permitted.
  25. Article 238 of the Flemish IED implementation Order aims at installations that fulfill the following conditions: (i) a IPPC-installation that is (ii) in operation and were granted an environmental permit before 7 January 2013 or for which a complete application for an environmental permit was introduced before 7 January 2013 and that was (iii) taken in operation at the latest on 7 July 2015 and (iv) that is covered by certain Vlarem I-sections that are listed exhaustively. Examples of this limitative list include: 2.4.1. Disposal or recovery of hazardous waste with a capacity exceeding 10 tons per day involving certain activities; 2.4.6 Underground storage of hazardous waste with a total capacity of exceeding 50 tons; 19, 9° production in industrial installations of one or more of the following wood-based panels: oriented strand board, particleboard, fibreboard with a production capacity exceeding 600 m³ per day; 43.3 Combustion of fuels in installations, including stationary engines and turbines, with a total rated thermal input of 50 MW or more.
  26. Risk land is to be understood as land on which a risk establishment is and/or was erected or on which a risk activity is and/or was being executed. The risk establishment or risk activity would fall within a list established by the Flemish government by Executive Order of December 14, 2007.
  27. Transfer of land includes, for example, the transfer of ownership of the land, the conclusion or termination of a concession of land, etc. The rules applicable in case of transfer of land prescribe mandatory information to be provided to the acquirer of land and, if risk land is concerned, may trigger soil remediation.
  28. With regard to new soil pollution (pollution originated after 28 October 1995): exceeding the soil remediation standards; with regard to historical soil pollution (pollution originated before 29 October 1995): assessment of a severe risk for human and the environment.
  29. These Articles refer to the exemptions from the duty to conduct a completely new PSS.

 

All rights reserved. Care has been taken to ensure that the content of this e-bulletin is as accurate as possible. However the accuracy and completeness of the information in this e-bulletin, largely based upon third party sources, cannot be guaranteed. The materials contained in this e-bulletin have been prepared and provided by Stibbe for information purposes only. They do not constitute legal or other professional advice and readers should not act upon the information contained in this e-bulletin without consulting legal counsel. Consultation of this e-bulletin will not create an attorney-client relationship between Stibbe and the reader. The e-bulletin may be used only for personal use and all other uses are prohibited.

Team

Related news

07.09.2018
Actuele trends in het luchtkwaliteitsbeleid

Articles - Zowel op Europees als op Vlaams niveau zijn er de laatste maanden een aantal evoluties merkbaar met het oog op de verbetering van de luchtkwaliteit. Beleidsmatig verbindt het bestuur er zich reeds lang toe om werk te maken van een betere luchtkwaliteit. Nieuwe maatregelen dienen om de luchtkwaliteit daadwerkelijk te verbeteren.  Ook individuele burgers eisen hun rol op in het debat.

Read more

21.09.2018 BE law
Toegang tot (milieu-)informatie en transparante besluitvorming: fundamentele pijlers van een democratische samenleving

Articles - In een recent arrest van 4 september 2018 tikt het Hof van Justitie de Europese Commissie op de vingers voor de geheimhouding die zij aan de dag legt tijdens milieuwetgevingsprocessen. Volgens het Hof van Justitie zijn openbaarheid van bestuur en transparante besluitvorming van fundamenteel belang voor een democratische samenleving.

Read more

12.09.2018 NL law
Wetsvoorstel wijziging Crisis- en herstelwet (Transitiewet Omgevingswet) ingediend bij de Tweede Kamer

Short Reads - Op 5 september 2018 heeft de regering het wetsvoorstel tot wijziging van de Crisis- en herstelwet (Chw) (Kamerstukken II 2017/18, 35 013, nrs 1-3) ingediend bij de Tweede Kamer. Het wetsvoorstel beoogt onder meer te voorzien in snellere en gemakkelijker procedures om woningbouw te versnellen. Ook overbrugt het wetsvoorstel de periode tot inwerkingtreding van de Omgevingswet (vooralsnog 1 januari 2021) en kan daarom ook worden beschouwd als een transitiewet naar de Omgevingswet.

Read more

Our website uses cookies: third party analytics cookies to best adapt our website to your needs & cookies to enable social media functionalities. For more information on the use of cookies, please check our Privacy and Cookie Policy. Please note that you can change your cookie opt-ins at any time via your browser settings.

Privacy – en cookieverklaring